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Uneven chromosome contraction and expansion in the maize genome - 2006 - News
2006 : Uneven chromosome contraction and expansion in the maize genome
Posted by webmaster on 2006/8/10 6:00:00 ( 180 reads )

Bruggmann R, Bharti AK, Gundlach H, Lai J, Young S, Pontaroli AC, Wei F, Haberer G, Fuks G, Du C, Raymond C, Estep MC, Liu R, Bennetzen JL, Chan AP, Rabinowicz PD, Quackenbush J, Barbazuk WB, Wing RA, Birren B, Nusbaum C, Rounsley S, Mayer KF, Messing J.

Genome Res. 2006 Oct;16(10):1241-51. Epub 2006 Aug 10.

Abstract
Maize (Zea mays or corn), both a major food source and an important cytogenetic model, evolved from a tetraploid that arose about 4.8 million years ago (Mya). As a result, maize has extensive duplicated regions within its genome. We have sequenced the two copies of one such region, generating 7.8 Mb of sequence spanning 17.4 cM of the short arm of chromosome 1 and 6.6 Mb (25.6 cM) from the long arm of chromosome 9. Rice, which did not undergo a similar whole genome duplication event, has only one orthologous region (4.9 Mb) on the short arm of chromosome 3, and can be used as reference for the maize homoeologous regions. Alignment of the three regions allowed identification of syntenic blocks, and indicated that the maize regions have undergone differential contraction in genic and intergenic regions and expansion by the insertion of retrotransposable elements. Approximately 9% of the predicted genes in each duplicated region are completely missing in the rice genome, and almost 20% have moved to other genomic locations. Predicted genes within these regions tend to be larger in maize than in rice, primarily because of the presence of predicted genes in maize with larger introns. Interestingly, the general gene methylation patterns in the maize homoeologous regions do not appear to have changed with contraction or expansion of their chromosomes. In addition, no differences in methylation of single genes and tandemly repeated gene copies have been detected. These results, therefore, provide new insights into the diploidization of polyploid species.

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Attached Files: Bruggmann_2006.pdf
Sponsors: A portion of AGIs material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 102620