The University of Arizona
Helping to Solve the 9 Billion-People Question
Institute Profile
The Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI) was formed in 2002 when Dr. Rod A. Wing joined the School of Plant Sciences at the University of Arizona in Tucson. The primary focus of AGI is in the area of structural, evolutionary and functional genomics of crop plants where it has played significant roles in over 30 plant and animal genome projects. AGI is divided into 4 Centers each lead by a Center Leader (BAC/EST Library Construction & Resource Center, Sequencing & Physical Mapping Center [including: production sequencing and fingerprinting, and sequence finishing], Bioinformatics Center, and the Evolutionary and Functional Genomics Center). AGI is housed in the state of the art Thomas W. Keating Bioresearch Building on the northeast part of the UA campus near the Arizona Health Science Center. AGI currently employees about 10 scientists and is primarily funded through federal grants, private contracts, and the Bud Antle Endowed Chair in Plant Molecular Genetics.
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AGI is an Approved PacBio Certified Service Provider

The Arizona Genomics Institute recently acquired a Pacific Biosciences Sequel state-of-the-art long-read sequencing instrument that is now available for service project sequencing. AGI has developed robust pipelines for sequencing whole genomes, transcriptomes and BAC clones. Pacbio sequencing uses Single Molecule Real Time sequencing of large templates to produce extremely long reads.
BAC/EST Resources Available for Distribution
Libraries: 365
Clones: 15,083,328
How can we solve world hunger with rice?
Recent News
‘Wild’ genes open up opportunities for healthier, climate-smart rice Posted by webmaster
Los Baños, Philippines (30th January 2018) — The genome sequencing of seven wild rice varieties has finally been completed. This breakthrough is expected to provide opportunities for breeders worldwide in developing better rice varieties that will respond to the changing needs of the farmers and the consumers.

This discovery is outlined in the article Genomes of 13 domesticated and wild rice relatives highlight genetic conservation, turnover and innovation across the genus Oryza published by Nature Genetics. The study details the generation of seven wild and two cultivated genomes (IR8 and N22). The IR8, popularly known as “miracle rice,” was developed by rice scientists from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI). IR8 was one of the rice varieties that ushered in the Green Revolution in Asia during the 1960s and prevented worldwide starvation and famine.

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A portion of AGI's material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 102620.