The University of Arizona
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News - KeyGene licenses Whole Genome Profiling to AGI - News

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News : KeyGene licenses Whole Genome Profiling to AGI
webmaster Posted on 2012/8/28 14:24:31 ( 1946 reads )

The Arizona Genome Institute (AGI) and KeyGene announced that they have entered into a broad license agreement that will enable AGI to market and execute sequence-based physical mapping projects using KeyGene’s proprietary Whole Genome Profiling (WGPTM) method.

The agreement includes on-site training to enable AGI scientists to apply the WGP method in their physical mapping projects. The agreement provides AGI with a state-of-the art solution to assemble physical maps of superior quality for internal research programs and customer projects. The WGP maps are used as scaffolds in whole genome sequencing programs, to provide direct access to Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs), containing genome segments of interest, and as a tool for revealing structural genome changes in evolutionary studies and breeding programs.

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News : KeyGene, AGI Ink Deal Covering Whole Genome Profiling Technology
webmaster Posted on 2012/8/27 15:38:14 ( 1167 reads )

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Agricultural genomics firm KeyGene and the Arizona Genome Institute today announced an agreement for the use of the Wageningen, Netherlands-based firm's Whole Genome Profiling method in sequencing-based physical mapping projects.

AGI will also market the WGP method as part of the deal, which provides the institute a method for assembling physical maps for internal research projects and customer projects. WGP maps serve as scaffolds in whole-genome sequencing projects, allowing researchers direct access to Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BAC), which contain genome segments of interest. The technology also can be used to ascertain structural genome changes in evolutionary studies and breeding programs, KeyGene and AGI said.

The WGP method uses next-generation sequencing to produce short-read sequences next to restriction enzyme recognition sites in BACs. The BACs are pooled, and BAC-pooled DNA are isolated based on protocols developed by KeyGene's co-marketing partner Amplicon Express.

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News : U.S. Scientist Develops New Rice Varieties for Hot, Dry Climate
webmaster Posted on 2012/8/14 12:09:03 ( 3040 reads )

A researcher working in the arid U.S. state of Arizona claims to have developed two strains of rice that can withstand hot and dry conditions after about seven years of research.

According to the University of Arizona researcher, Dr. Paul Sanchez, the new strains of rice have survived the hot and dry conditions of Arizona this year. Moreover, the strains are growing and multiplying in Arizona for the first time, said the researcher.

Dr Sanchez says that he plans to expand his research to develop heat resistant corn and wheat strains as well. This year, dry and hot conditions in the U.S. has led to a massive drop in corn production.

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News : UA researcher developing drought-resistant crops
webmaster Posted on 2012/8/9 8:43:38 ( 3319 reads )



Despite the recent rainfall totals from monsoon storms the Southwest, and much of the country, is still battling the worst drought in decades. Here in Tucson, one University of Arizona researcher is developing strains of rice that can grow in these hot, dry conditions. It is a local project that could have a global impact.

Dr. Paul Sanchez started his research back in 2005 and has already developed two promising strains of rice that can tolerate heat. It is a pretty big discovery, since rice is a major food source for more than half of the world's population.

"When I first started this project I didn't know that rice would grow," Sanchez said.

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News : 100 days of science: UA corn-genetics work enabling quicker adaptations for vital crop
webmaster Posted on 2012/7/13 11:44:49 ( 1097 reads )

Click to see original Image in a new windowThe Arizona Daily Star's Centennial salute to science in Arizona runs all summer. Each day, for 100 days, we'll record a milestone in the state's scientific history.

Researchers at the University of Arizona followed up their 2004 sequencing of the rice genome with work on the other important cereal crop - corn.

It took about 50 researchers - including 10 working full time at the UA - $30 million and four years to produce a blueprint for manipulating the corn, or maize, genome.

That was a big improvement over the six years and $200 million it took to crack the code for rice. Improvements in knowledge, techniques and equipment are quickly chipping away at the cost of genetic research, said Rod Wing, director of the Arizona Genomics Institute.

Similar studies could be done today for $500,000, Wing said.

The roadmaps produced by the plant geneticists will enable quicker adaptations for a host of food crops, said Wing.

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News : 100 days of science: Gene researcher strives to create super-rice that will feed billions
webmaster Posted on 2012/7/9 11:18:35 ( 1155 reads )

Click to see original Image in a new windowRod Wing, director of the Arizona Genomics Institute, holds a petri plate of E. coli clones containing corn DNA. His lab is leading a project to sequence genes of wild rice.







The Arizona Daily Star's Centennial salute to science in Arizona runs all summer. Each day, for 100 days, we'll record a milestone in the state's scientific history.

Rod Wing, director of the Arizona Genomics Institute, said he likes to "surprise people" by telling them the University of Arizona is the largest producer of rice in the state.

The rice grows in experimental plots in the greenhouses and fields of the UA's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences - an outgrowth of research in Wing's lab to help solve the Earth's looming food crisis by creating new strains of the cereal crops that make up 60 percent of humankind's diet.

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News : UA Geneticists Help Make Tomato Genome an Open Book
webmaster Posted on 2012/5/31 15:37:58 ( 4326 reads )

Click to see original Image in a new windowAn international consortium has deciphered the genetic code of the cultivated tomato and a wild relative.

The complete genetic information of the cultivated tomato and its closest wild relative, Solanum pimpinellifolium, have been sequenced by the Tomato Genome Consortium, or TGC, a group of more than 300 scientists from 14 countries.

Published as a cover story in the May 31 issue of the journal Nature, the results from this effort are expected to reduce costs and streamline efforts to improve tomato production and resistance to pests and drought.

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News : The Arizona Genomics Institute participation at this weekend's Tucson Festival of Books
  webmaster Posted on 2012/3/12 15:30:00 ( 1537 reads )

The Arizona Genomics Institute in action at Science City (3/2012) -- “Feeding the World with Rice Genomics”
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News : USA Rice Daily -- Arizona Researcher Pursuing Drought-Tolerant Rice Varieties
webmaster Posted on 2012/1/31 22:10:00 ( 75194 reads )

Click to see original Image in a new windowTUCSON, AZ -- With much drier and warmer than average weather conditions affecting much of Texas for more than a year, news that a rice researcher at the University of Arizona is developing desert-friendly rice varieties for U.S. and international growers is likely to be well received. Dr. Paul Sanchez, a rice breeder and wild rice specialist, is researching promising heat-and drought-tolerant rice varieties that can be grown not only in the Arizona desert, but also other areas that are impacted by drought and extremely warm temperatures. The project is supported by Dr. Rod A. Wing, Antle professor and director of the Arizona Genomics Institute.

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News : AGI will be participating in the 9th Annual Math & Science Fun Fest (2/16-17/2012)
webmaster Posted on 2012/1/27 16:30:00 ( 1462 reads )

Tucson’s Annual Math Science Technology Funfest (MSTFF) will be featuring hands-on and informational activities aimed at getting students excited about the WONDER FULL WORLD OF PLANTS and plant science under the overarching theme of “Feeding The World”. Please come out to the Tucson Convention Center on February 16th & 17th from 9am-1pm and join the fun and excitement of teaching kids about the importance of our research and that they too can make a difference in helping solve the 9-billion people question. If interested in volunteering it’s not too late – please contact Ms. Caryl Jones (AGI’s outreach coordinator) at cjones@cals.arizona.edu, and/or Dr. Tanya Quist at tquist@cals.arizona.edu for more information. See you there!!!!!!!!
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A portion of AGI's material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 102620.